From 'naked' to fully equipped machine in twenty hours

Erik Gunnarsson is one of the people working in final assembly and final inspection, the last two stations in Huddig’s production process. Erik has been working at Huddig since 2004 and enjoys it, largely thanks to his colleagues and because he feels that he is always learning new things.

–Huddig is an exciting company to work for. We have a product that you can do almost anything with and we are developing new solutions on an ongoing basis. Personally, I want to be developing and learning more about the machine all the time so that I can be more independent in my work. When I work evening shifts, for instance, I want to be able to solve any problems that arise myself.

At the final assembly station, Erik and his three colleagues deal with the corrections noted for the machine in the noise box, the preceding station.

–The machine comes to us ‘naked’. We attach the bodywork, engine cover and rear wings, assemble the AC in the cab and all the other components. We always start by printing a new shipping note for each station and checking that everything that the customer has ordered is in place. When there are two people, it takes between ten and twenty hours for the machine to pass the final assembly, depending on which segment we are adapting it for.

The customer can also request changes at any point of the production process

–I’ve been involved in situations where the machine is ready to be driven up onto the trailer, when the customer wants to change buckets and add more decals – which is something that we obviously solve. We can be very flexible and make changes quickly by maintaining such close cooperation.

Once the final assembly work is complete, it’s time for final inspection.

–We carry out a test run to test all the components. How many hours a machine is run for varies. The customer may also request that the machine be run for a certain number of hours prior to delivery. We connect the bucket front and back, test the load damping and check the hydraulics to ensure they run smoothly. We also carry out a test during which we lift the entire machine, 14 tonnes, using the loader and the backhoe. If we find any faults, we make a note of them and when we get back in, we fix them immediately or get help from design, someone from the office, etc. Everyone helps to solve problems in the best way possible.

The most important thing for Erik is to have close interaction with customers at all times.

–When the customer orders a machine, they are invited to come and watch when we’re putting the screws in or to be involved in a specific part of the production process. Sometimes customers want to be in the cab when we test run the machine. It’s great to hear their perspectives, what they’re working on and how they intend to use the machine. It is together with and for the customers that we are developing Huddig. Communication with customers also takes place at various fairs, which are a part of the job that I really enjoy.

 Erik is also a safety representative and is continuously working to ensure an ever safer work environment.

–At Huddig I really feel that I can develop. I’ve been the safety and clothing representative for a few years now, and I feel proud to have played a part in ensuring the workplace is safe in every way. Another thing that I am passionate about is training the new employees who come to us.

Like many other people at the company, Erik is next looking forward to Tigon launching on the market.

–Tigon is a full hybrid. The technology means that you can run it solely on electricity, solely on diesel or on a mix of diesel and electricity. The battery is charged on every downhill descent and the diesel engine can be started while the machine is running – as soon as it starts, the battery starts recharging. It will really be exciting to start working with Tigon and above all to hear what our customers think about it, Erik concludes.

<span>Erik Gunnarsson is one of the people working in final assembly and final inspection, the last two stations in Huddig’s production process. Erik has been working at Huddig since 2004 and enjoys it, largely thanks to his colleagues and because he feels that he is always learning new things. </span></p> <p><span>–Huddig is an exciting company to work for. We have a product that you can do almost anything with and we are developing new solutions on an ongoing basis. Personally, I want to be developing and learning more about the machine all the time so that I can be more independent in my work. When I work evening shifts, for instance, I want to be able to solve any problems that arise myself.</span></p> <p>At the final assembly station, Erik and his three colleagues deal with the corrections noted for the machine in the noise box, the preceding station.</p> <p><span>–The machine comes to us ‘naked’. We attach the bodywork, engine cover and rear wings, assemble the AC in the cab and all the other components. We always start by printing a new shipping note for each station and checking that everything that the customer has ordered is in place. When there are two people, it takes between ten and twenty hours for the machine to pass the final assembly, depending on which segment we are adapting it for.</span></p> <p><span>The customer can also request changes at any point of the production process </span></p> <p><span>–I’ve been involved in situations where the machine is ready to be driven up onto the trailer, when the customer wants to change buckets and add more decals – which is something that we obviously solve. We can be very flexible and make changes quickly by maintaining such close cooperation.</span></p> <p><span>Once the final assembly work is complete, it’s time for final inspection. </span></p> <p><span>–We carry out a test run to test all the components. How many hours a machine is run for varies. The customer may also request that the machine be run for a certain number of hours prior to delivery. We connect the bucket front and back, test the load damping and check the hydraulics to ensure they run smoothly. We also carry out a test during which we lift the entire machine, 14 tonnes, using the loader and the backhoe. If we find any faults, we make a note of them and when we get back in, we fix them immediately or get help from design, someone from the office, etc. Everyone helps to solve problems in the best way possible.</span></p> <p><span>The most important thing for Erik is to have close interaction with customers at all times. </span></p> <p><span>–When the customer orders a machine, they are invited to come and watch when we’re putting the screws in or to be involved in a specific part of the production process. Sometimes customers want to be in the cab when we test run the machine. It’s great to hear their perspectives, what they’re working on and how they intend to use the machine. It is together with and for the customers that we are developing Huddig. Communication with customers also takes place at various fairs, which are a part of the job that I really enjoy.</span></p> <p><span> </span><span>Erik is also a safety representative and is continuously working to ensure an ever safer work environment. </span></p> <p><span>–At Huddig I really feel that I can develop. I’ve been the safety and clothing representative for a few years now, and I feel proud to have played a part in ensuring the workplace is safe in every way. Another thing that I am passionate about is training the new employees who come to us.</span></p> <p><span>Like many other people at the company, Erik is next looking forward to Tigon launching on the market. </span></p> <p><span>–Tigon is a full hybrid. The technology means that you can run it solely on electricity, solely on diesel or on a mix of diesel and electricity. The battery is charged on every downhill descent and the diesel engine can be started while the machine is running – as soon as it starts, the battery starts recharging. It will really be exciting to start working with Tigon and above all to hear what our customers think about it, Erik concludes.</span>